• SEPTEMBER 23-24-25@TEATRO BRANCACCIO, ROMA

    2016 ATTACHMENT
    AND TRAUMA:
    RELATIONSHIPS AND COMPASSION

    Join us in 3 days full of inspiration and education on Attachment and Trauma. 10 speakers will provide insights into their work and offer ways to make us all better at what we do.

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2016 CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Bring back memories

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Attachment and Trauma 2016: Relationships and Compassion

EXPERTS IN THE FIELD

We are proud to introduce 10 speakers from all over the world to participate in this year.

36 HOURS OF CONGRESS

Three-day conference with leading experts in psychotherapy.

SIMULTANEOUS TRANSLATION

Simultaneous translation from English into Italian for you comfortable.

DOWNLOAD BROCHURE

Download event brochure

Vittorio Gallese

Vittorio Gallese

EMOTIONS IN ACTION. EMOTION REGULATION AND RECOGNITION IN TRAUMATIZED AND NEGLECTED YOUNG INDIVIDUALS..

According to a widely shared perspective, experiencing and expressing a given emotion are two different and independent processes. I’ll proposean alternative perspective: the behaviour connected to a specific emotion is part of the emotion itself. In my talk I will present and discuss recent neuroscientific studies showing the link between emotion experience and expression. I will also present recent empirical research on the impact of trauma and neglect on emotion regulation and recognition in children and young adolescents.

Kathy Steele

Kathy Steele

A SICKNESS OF THE SOUL:UNDERSTANDING AND TREATING CHRONIC SHAME.

Chronic shame often underlies impasse, resistance, and relational disconnection in psychotherapy. It is a major factor in ongoing appeasing behaviors, revictimization, rage, selfharm, substance abuse, isolation, and dissociation, among many others. Childhood abuse and neglect are risk factors for chronic shame, and it is a strong mediator between child abuse and adult psychopathology, including dissociation. By its very nature, shame is hidden from others, including the therapist, much of the time. Shame is reexperienced in the same way as traumatic memories, with symptoms of intrusion, avoidance and arousal, and thus must be approached carefully within a window of tolerance of the patient. Shame is often avoided in treatment by therapist and patient alike, and both attempt to eradicate it as quickly as possible when it is acknowledged. However, the therapeutic approach to all other emotions is first to accept them with compassion and understanding, not to eliminate them. So it should be with shame as well. Therapists often feel they do not have sufficient skills to address shame effectively, as it is so powerful, embedded, alienating and disconnecting. Talking about shame is often ineffective because its physiology involves a temporary loss of cognitive and verbal capacities. We will explore the several functions of shame, and the inner shame dynamics in internal working models and dissociative parts of self. An integration of topdown and bottomup interventions will be discussed that can transform chronic shame into relational connection, and selfcompassion and competence, as well as ways to help patients (and therapists) develop resilience to shame reactions. Most importantly, we will examine how to be with shame our own and our patients – with curiosity and compassion, finding ways to deeply attune with and repair shame in a relational space.

Daniel Siegel

Daniel Siegel

THE EMBODIED AND RELATIONAL MIND IN PSYCHOTHERAPY: A VIEW FROM THE FIELD OF INTERPERSONAL NEUROBIOLOGY.
Why does the field of mental health have virtually no definition of the mental or of the health? Even in academic fields beyond the clinical professions, including medicine and psychotherapy, there is no definition of the term, “mind” offered from neuroscience to anthropology. In this presentation, this odd finding will be discussed and the benefits of exploring what the mind is, what a healthy mind might be, and how therapists can cultivate a healthy mind based on scientific findings will be explore in detail.

Rachel Yehuda

Rachel Yehuda

CAN THE EFFECT OF TRAUMA BE TRANSMITTED INTERGENERATIONALLY?

Recent advances in molecular biology, genomics, and epigenomics, has now provided paradigms for understanding long term effects of stress. This presentation will focus on intergenerational transmission of trauma as a particularly enduring effect of stress. Most of the research has been conducted on adult children of Holocaust survivors, but has now generalized to include children of other trauma survivors such as children born to pregnant women who survived the world trade center attack on 9/11. The research has evolved into one that explains the contribution of early environmental experiences-including parenting-on highly conserved molecular and genomic processes. These changes in and of themselves do not signify pathology, but provide a paradigm for understanding long term effects of profoundly important events. The work has already led to a better understanding of biological risk factors for PTSD, and predictors of outcome in response to trauma.

  OUR SPEAKERS
 
We are proud to introduce 10 speakers from all over the world to participate in this year.
 
Porges Stephen

Porges Stephen

CONNECTEDNESS AS BIOLOGICAL IMPERATIVE: UNDERSTANDING THE CONSEQUENCES

OF TRAUMA, ABUSE, AND CHRONIC STRESS THROUGH THE LENS OF THE POLYVAGAL THEORY.

Polyvagal Theory expands our understanding of normal and atypical behavior, mental health, and psychiatric disorders. Polyvagal Theory, by incorporating a developmental perspective, explains how maturation of the autonomic nervous system forms the neural “platform” upon which social behavior and the development of trusting relationships are based. The theory explains how reactions

to danger and life threat and experiences of abuse and trauma may retune our nervous system to respond to friends, caregivers, and teachers as if they were predators. The theory may help practitioners distinguish the contextual features that trigger defense from those that are calming and support spontaneous social engagement.

Paul Gilbert

Paul Gilbert

COMPASSION FOCUSED THERAPY AND THE FEARS BLOCKS AN RESISTANCES TO COMPASSION

This talk will give a brief outline of the nature of compassion and how compassion is used in therapeutic interventions and personal change. However, early in the development of compassion focused therapy it became clear that many people were very resistant to both the idea and the feelings of compassion. This talk will outline some of the research on the fears of compassion along with ways in which the therapists can work with those difficulties. CFT uses exposurebased interventions and therefore facilitating people to increase their capacities to experience and tolerate affiliative emotion is central.

Pat Odgen

Pat Odgen

A SICKNESS OF THE SOUL:UNDERSTANDING AND TREATING CHRONIC SHAME.

Chronic shame often underlies impasse, resistance, and relational disconnection in psychotherapy. It is a major factor in ongoing appeasing behaviors, revictimization, rage, selfharm, substance abuse, isolation, and dissociation, among many others. Childhood abuse and neglect are risk factors for chronic shame, and it is a strong mediator between child abuse and adult psychopathology, including dissociation. By its very nature, shame is hidden from others, including the therapist, much of the time. Shame is reexperienced in the same way as traumatic memories, with symptoms of intrusion, avoidance and arousal, and thus must be approached carefully within a window of tolerance of the patient. Shame is often avoided in treatment by therapist and patient alike, and both attempt to eradicate it as quickly as possible when it is acknowledged. However, the therapeutic approach to all other emotions is first to accept them with compassion and understanding, not to eliminate them. So it should be with shame as well. Therapists often feel they do not have sufficient skills to address shame effectively, as it is so powerful, embedded, alienating and disconnecting. Talking about shame is often ineffective because its physiology involves a temporary loss of cognitive and verbal capacities. We will explore the several functions of shame, and the inner shame dynamics in internal working models and dissociative parts of self. An integration of topdown and bottomup interventions will be discussed that can transform chronic shame into relational connection, and selfcompassion and competence, as well as ways to help patients (and therapists) develop resilience to shame reactions. Most importantly, we will examine how to be with shame our own and our patients – with curiosity and compassion, finding ways to deeply attune with and repair shame in a relational space.

Jon Kabat Zinn

Jon Kabat Zinn

Live Video Conference

Live Video Conference

The Global Phenomenon of Mindfulness Becoming Mainstream: Its Meaning, Its Promise, and Its Perils

In this presentation and dialogue, Jon will describe mindfulness training in MBSR and other mindfulness-based interventions for health and wellbeing as the deep and direct non-dual realization of relationality: with one’s own body, breath, evaluations of pleasant vs unpleasant experiences (inward and outward), thoughts and emotions, and insight into the nature of suffering and self, wakefulness and healing, and into time and the timeless.  He will emphasize that the cultivation of mindfulness in the face of stress, pain, illness, and even trauma under the right conditions, can lead to greater integration of one’s experience, greater wellbeing, and greater meaningful connectivity with others and the world.  He will assert that just opening to the present moment without an agenda other than to be awake and aware is in itself a radical act of love and of sanity. He welcomes an active dialogue with Drs. Siegel and Carmelita and with the audience, and regrets not being able to be there in person.

Diana Fosha

Diana Fosha

THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF HEALING: A FRAMEWORK FOR UNDOING ALONENESS AND DOING TRASFORMATIONAL WORK IN AEDP

 

Four foundational aspects of AEDP (Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy) allow it to reliably do transformational work and transform suffering into flourishing:

(i) Its healing orientation, and its belief, supported by neurobiology and recent advances in neuroplasticity,  that we are all self-righting organisms wired with an innate motivational tendency, towards health, healing and growth, which in the right environments, can be potentiated into clinical action; (ii) Undoing the aloneness that  people feel in the face of overwhelming emotional experiences through an attachment-based stance and dyadic affect regulatory techniques;  (iii) Mobilizing subcortical affective systems specialized to adapt to environmental changes by rapidly transforming behavior through its experiential interventions and transformational work with intense emotions; and (iv) Metatherapeutic processing techniques, where, by experientially working with theexperience of transformation, and the  positive emotions invariably associated with moments of change for the better,  non-finite upward spirals of positive emotions are systematically activated. The positive emotions that fuel the self with  energy and vitality, are the vehicles of neuroplasticity that, in effect, re-wire the brain.    AEDP emphasizes the  co-creation of safety: with accompaniment, patients can risk revisiting past trauma and suffering. Healing and neuroplasticity are set in motion through fully experiencing previously feared emotions in a secure relationship, and through gentle, yet focused, explicit attention to the  experience of healing within the patient-therapist relationship. Processing both traumatic and restorative emotional experiences to completion, the AEDP process culminates in vitality, energy, and the non-finite positive emotion-fueled spirals of resilience, well-being and creativity that are so highly correlated with health. Clinical videotapes of AEDP in action will  be used to illuminate how emotional suffering can be not only ameliorated, but systematically and reliably transformed into resilience,  flourishing, and well being.

Allan Schore

Allan Schore

The development of the right brain across the life span: What's love got to do with it”

I’ll be using the perspective of regulation theory in order to interpret a significant body of neuroimaging research on love in infancy and adulthood in order to more deeply understand the right brain attachment origins and underlying psychoneurobiological mechanisms of the capacity to form and maintain a strong emotional bond of mutual love. After an introduction and background, I will discuss recent developmental neuroimaging and conceptualizations of mother’s love, a model of the initial emergence of mutual love at 23 months, and then current adult neuroimaging and conceptualizations of adult love. In the final section I will integrate research and clinical data to model the neuroanatomy, neuropsychology, and neuropsychoanalysis of this essential marker of what it means to be human.

EVENT SCHEDULE

  • Teatro Brancaccio
    Roma

  • Sep 23 - 24 - 25, 2016
    08:00 - 18:30

  • 1280 Seats Available
    Hurryup! Only 500 discounted ticket price!

  • 8:00 - 9:30

    Registration

  • 9:30 - 11:00

    The development of the right brain across the life span: What's love got to do with it

    by Allan Schore

  • 11:00 - 11:30

    Coffee break

  • 11:30 - 13:00

    Emotions in action. Emotion regulation and recognition in traumatized and neglected young individuals

    by Vittorio Gallese
  • 13:00 - 14:30

    Lunch break

  • 14:30 - 16:00

    Connectedness as Biological Imperative: Understanding the consequences of trauma, abuse, and chronic stress through the lens of the Polyvagal Theory

    by Stephen Porges
  • 16:00 - 16:30

    Coffee Break

  • 16:30 - 18:30

    Love, Relationships and the Brain: trauma and its consequences

    Round-table discussion Allan Schore, Vittorio Gallese, Stephen
    Porges

  • 8:30 - 9:30

    Can the effect of trauma be transmitted intergenerationally?

    by Rachel Yehuda
  • 9:30 - 11:00

    The Neurobiology of Healing: A Framework for Undoing Aloneness and Doing Transformational Work in AEDP

    by Diana Fosha
  • 11:00 - 11:30

    Coffee Break

  • 11:30 - 13:00

    Compassion focused therapy and the fears blocks and resistances to compassion

    by Paul Gilbert
  • 13:30 - 15:00

    Lunch break

  • 14:30 - 16:00

    Only Everything! What Mindfulness and Heartfulness have to do with Relationality, Compassion, and Healing

    by Jon Kabat Zinn - Live Video Conference
  • 16.00 - 16.30

    Coffee Break

  • 16:00 - 18:30

    Transgenerational trauma, Mindfulness, Compassion, and overcoming Trauma

    Round-table discussion:  Rachel Yehuda, Diana, Fosha, Paul Gilbert
  • 9:30 - 11:00

    A Sickness of the Soul: Understanding and Treating Chronic Shame

    by Kathy Steele
  • 11:00 - 11:30

    Coffee Break

  • 11:30 - 13:00

    The Challenging Client: Cultivating the Body as Resource through the Lens of Sensorimotor Psychotherapy

    by Pat Ogden
  • 13:00 - 14:30

    Lunch break

  • 14:30 - 16:00

    The Embodied and Relational Mind in Psychotherapy: A view from the field of Interpersonal Neurobiology

    by Daniel Siegel
  • 16:00 - 16:30

    Coffee break

  • 16:30 - 18:30

    Trauma, Emotion, Body, Relationships and Compassion

    Round-table discussion:  Daniel Siegel, Pat Ogden, Kathy Steele

TESTIMONIAL

Here's what people are saying who have participated in previous editions of the congress.

“It was such a mindblowing conference and I was so touched to be there. I congratulate you for organising this rich event ”

Dr. Q
Dr. Q
Psychotherapist

“Desidero ringraziarvi per il bellissimo congresso!E’ stata un’esperienza molto bella…”

Dr. Marco
Dr. Marco
Psychotherapist

“Grazie di cuore per aver organizzato un evento di tale portata”

Dr. Luca Rossi
Dr. Luca Rossi
Psychotherapist

“Every year I wait impatiently this event. The best event dedicated to attachment and Trauma ”

Dr. Mark
Dr. Mark
Psychotherapist

FAQ & QUESTIONS

The following frequently asked questions. For further questions please contact us.

How can I order more than 1 ticket at the same time

Go to "Number of Tickets" and select the number of tickets requested using the arrows.

Each ticket is worth one entry?

Yes, by purchasing a ticket you are entitled to access only!

You lean to partner hotels?

Of course! You can find the list of participating hotels in the "Accomodation Info" section.

Can I book the hotel directly on site Italy Congress?

We! We suggest that you contact the hotel choice and ask about availability

Which payment gateways do you accept?

We accept payments through Paypal and Bank Transfer.

I would like to pay by bank transfer, how can I do?

Bank transfer to:
Instituto di Scienze Cognitive srl.
Unicredit - IBAN IT51 E020 0850 5200 0010 2655 685
Reason: Congress, membership of _______________ (insert your name)
In case of cancellation notified by email by 28 February will be reimbursed
50%; After that date it will keep the entire fee

ACCOMMODATION INFO

OUR LOCATION

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CONTACT INFO

—   Istituto di Scienze Cognitive SRL

 

—   Via Rolando, Sassari

 

—   isc@istitutodiscienzecognitive.it

LOCATION INFO

— Teatro Brancaccio, Roma

— Sep 23rd-24th-25th, 2016

— Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PMM

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*Note: Your email address will be kept secret and not be published